Title

When the Sportswriters Go Marching In: Sports Journalism, Collective Trauma, and Memory Metaphors

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2010

Abstract

This critical essay examines the intersection of sports, journalism, and collective memory through a case study of media coverage of the National Football League's (NFL) New Orleans Saints' unexpectedly successful 2006 performance following Hurricane Katrina. I argue that sports journalism invoked and negotiated the memory of Katrina and produced a largely uniform media narrative—one which relentlessly employed a winning team as the trope for metaphorical recovery and a means of the collective simultaneously coping with and escaping from traumatic memory. Moreover, I problematize the fact that, at a time the city was still in need of real—not just mythic—solutions, a storyline of triumph was diffused with little critique.

Comments

Copyright 2010 Critical Studies in Media Communications, Routledge Journals.

Link to full-text provided for authorized subscribers.

Publication Title

Critical Studies in Media Communication

Published Citation

Serazio, Michael. 2010. When the Sportswriters Go Marching In: Sports Journalism, Collective Trauma, and Memory Metaphors. Critical Studies in Media Communication 27 (2), 155-173.

DOI

10.1080/15295030903551009

Peer Reviewed