Title

Family communication patterns and conflict styles in Chinese parent-child relationships

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2007

Abstract

This study investigated Chinese family communication patterns, their effects on children's conflict styles, and the children's perceptions of parent-child relationship satisfaction. The study found that Chinese family communication patterns are more conversation-oriented than conformity-oriented, and the collaborating and accommodating styles are the children's most preferred and the competing style the least preferred. The children from conversation-oriented families are most likely to use the collaborating style but unlikely to use the avoiding style, whereas the children from conformity-oriented families are most likely to use the competing style but unlikely to use the collaborating style. The finding also indicated that children are more satisfied with the conversation orientation than with the conformity orientation and with the collaborating, compromising, and accommodating styles than with competing and avoiding styles in parent-child relationships.

Comments

Copyright 2007 Taylor and Francis

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Publication Title

Communication Quarterly

Published Citation

Zhang, Qin (2007). "Family communication patterns and conflict styles in Chinese parent-child relationships." Communication Quarterly, 55 (1), 113-128.

DOI

10.1080/01463370600998681