Title

Village Life and Family Power in Late Antique Nessana

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2011

Abstract

This article explores social structures and family competition in late antique Nessana. Nessana, a small village in the Negev, is attested through archaeological, papyrological, and epigraphic remains. This evidence shows that the engine of social change was family power. Nessana experienced remarkable growth, including construction of four new churches and two monasteries. The driving forces behind each institution came from distinct local families in ongoing competition with one another. This localizing model of family power challenges the standard models of provincial economy and society in the late antique east, which imagine a world of great estates and powerful aristocrats.

Comments

Copyright 2011 Transactions of the American Philological Association, Johns Hopkins University Press.

A link to full-text has been provided for authorized subscribers.

Publication Title

Transactions of the American Philological Association

Published Citation

Ruffini, G. (2011). “Village Life and Family Power in Late Antique Nessana.” Transactions of the American Philological Association 141 (2011): 201-225.

DOI

10.1353/apa.2011.0002

Peer Reviewed