Artist

Paul Gauguin (French artist, 1848-1903)

Date

ca. 1630 (creation)

Alternate Title

Vulcan's Forge

Preview

image preview

Artist ID

500011421

Vocabulary

ULAN

Description

Wearing a laurel crown and orange tunic, the god Apollo enters Vulcan's forge to warn him that his wife, Venus, goddess of beauty, is having an adulterous affair with Mars, god of war. Apollo, god of poetry and music and knower of the truth, represents the superiority of Art over Craft, which is embodied by Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and protector of blacksmiths. This work was totally conceived by Velasquez and wasn't commissioned by anyone. It constitutes praise of artists by raising painting to the level of poetry and music and distancing it from the work of craftsmen. This work was made in Rome during Velasquez's first visit to Italy. It is outstanding for its references to Greco-Roman statuary —in the treatment of the nudes— and to the Italian classicist Baroque. The composition is a broadly modified interpretation of an engraving by Antonio Tempesta. This canvas was acquired by Felipe IV in 1634 and is listed in the 1701 inventory of the Buen Retiro Palace, and in the 1772 and 1794 inventories of Madrid's Royal Palace. It entered the Prado Museum in 1819.

Description Source

Museo Nacional del Prado website; http://www.museodelprado.es/en/ingles/collection/on-line-gallery/on-line-gallery/obra/vulcans-forge/

Culture

French

Classification

Paintings

Work Type

paintings

Work Technique

painting, oil

Location

Museo del Prado (Madrid, Madrid, Spain) P01171

Material

oil on canvas

Measurements

223 x 290 cm (overall)

Image Rights

copyrighted

Image Source

Walther, Ingo F.; Paul Gauguin: 1848-1903, The Primitive Sophisticate, Koln: Taschen, 2006 (978-3-8228-5986-5)

File Type

jpg

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