Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies

Nubian studies needs a platform in which the old meets the new, in which archaeological, papyrological, and philological research into Meroitic, Old Nubian, Coptic, Greek, and Arabic sources confront current investigations in modern anthropology and ethnography, Nilo-­Saharan linguistics, and critical and theoretical approaches present in post­colonial and African studies.

The journal Dotawo: A Journal of Nubian Studies brings these disparate fields together within the same fold, opening a cross­-cultural and diachronic field where divergent approaches meet on common soil. Dotawo gives a common home to the past, present, and future of one of the richest areas of research in African studies. It offers a crossroads where papyrus can meet internet, scribes meet critical thinkers, and the promises of growing nations meet the accomplishments of old kingdoms.

We embrace a powerful alternative to the dominant paradigms of academic publishing. We believe in free access to information. Accordingly, we are proud to collaborate with DigitalCommons@Fairfield, an institutional repository of Fairfield University in Connecticut, USA, and with open-access publishing house punctum books. Thanks to these collaborations, every volume of Dotawo will be available both as a free online pdf and in online bookstores.

Current Volume: Volume 3 (2016) Know-Hows and Techniques in Ancient Sudan

It is a great pleasure to introduce the third volume of Dotawo, dedicated to Know-Hows and Techniques in Ancient Sudan.

This collection of articles is the result of a workshop held at Lille University on September 5–6, 2013, which grouped several Sudanese archaeology scholars, from fields ranging from architecture to iron production through pottery and the textile industry.

Organized by Faïza Drici, Marie Evina, and Romain David, with the support of Charles de Gaulle–Lille 3 University and the laboratoire de recherche Halma-Ipel umr 8164 (cnrs), this workshop was presided over by Vincent Rondot (present Director of the Egyptian Antiquities Department of the Louvre Museum and former sfdas Director). This meeting was following a first workshop supported by Dominique Valbelle (umr 8167 cnrs Orient et Méditerranée, section Mondes Pharaoniques) and organized in Paris-Sorbonne University in September 2011. Entitled Cultural Exchanges in Ancient Sudan, it was supervised by Hélène Delattre and the present writer and presided by Claude Rilly (umr 8135 cnrs/Llacan and former sfdas Director).

This foreword is also a good opportunity to thank all the contributors to this volume, and the editorial committee of Dotawo, particularly Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei and Giovanni Ruffini.

A special thanks to Robin Seignobos, who helped us to launch the publication project and supported it since the beginning. Without their help, none of these articles would ever have been published.

Marc Maillot

sfdas/French Unit

August 2016

Khartoum, Sudan