Document Type

Article

Article Version

Post-print

Publication Date

8-2020

Abstract

Nurses experience high rates of violence on the job, which is a significant stressor. Stress can alter nurses' care of patients, but stress can be mitigated by resilience. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between nurses' resilience levels and their reports of patient care following episodes of workplace violence. Six themes emerged from nurses' (n = 57) responses to workplace violence: vigilance, cautious yet individualized with care, part of the job, growth, jaded, and no effect. Low resilience levels were found in nurses with themes of feeling jaded, cautious yet individualized with care, and vigilance. High resilience levels were found in nurses with themes of no effect, growth, cautious yet individualized with care, and vigilance. Nurses' resilience scores were related to their patient care descriptions after episodes of workplace violence. Raising nurses' resilience levels through training might help them to positively overcome the effects of workplace violence, limiting impacts to patient care.

Comments

© 2020 Elsevier Inc

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License.

The author post-print has been archived here with permission from the copyright holder.

Publication Title

Applied Nursing Research

Published Citation

Hollywood, Lauren, and Kathryn E. Phillips. “Nurses’ Resilience Levels and the Effects of Workplace Violence on Patient Care.” Applied Nursing Research. 54 (August 2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apnr.2020.151321.

DOI

10.1016/j.apnr.2020.151321

Peer Reviewed

Available for download on Sunday, August 01, 2021

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